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Portfolio William Adolphe Bouguereau. The complete works. (424: Oil, Oil On Canvas, Oil On Panel, Painting)

 

  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - The wave
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Biblis
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - The Abduction of Psyche
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Dante and Virgil in Hell
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Dante and Virgil in Hell
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Vierge consolatrice
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - La Comtesse de Montholon
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - La charite
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Portrait of Miss Elizabeth Gardner Bouguereau
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Orestes Pursued by the Furies
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Gabrielle cot
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - The Remorse of Orestes
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Study of the Head of Elize Brugière
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Idylle enfantine
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - A Portrait of Léonie Bouguereau
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - The Joys of Motherhood (Girl Tickling a Child)
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - FemmeAuCoquillage
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Flora and Zephyr
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Charity
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - L'orientale à la grenade
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Dante et Virgile au Enfers
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Dante and Virgil in Hell
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Nymphes et satyre (also known as Nymphs and Saytr)
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Return from the Harvest
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Une petite fille
  • William Adolphe Bouguereau - Naissance de Venus
 
All 424 Artworks from William Adolphe Bouguereau





 Biography
French painter. From 1838 to 1841 he took drawing lessons from Louis Sage, a pupil of Ingres......
 Biography
The career of William Bouguereau, unlike that of his contemporaries, the then avant-garde Impressionists, was one of ever-increasing success without significant setback.
 The Art Journal (1905)
Bouguereau's death in 1905 was mentioned briefly in the 1905 edition of The Art Journal, p.349

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (November 30, 1825 – August 19, 1905) was a French academic painter. William Bouguereau (French: [wiljɑm buɡ(ə)ˈʁo]) was a traditionalist; in his realistic genre paintings he used mythological themes, making modern interpretations of Classical subjects, with an emphasis on the female human body.

William-Adolphe Bouguereau was born in La Rochelle, France on November 30, 1825, into a family of wine and olive oil merchants. He seemed destined to join the family business but for the intervention of his uncle Eugène, a Roman Catholic priest, who taught him classical and Biblical subjects, and arranged for Bouguereau to go to high school. He showed artistic talent early on. His father was convinced by a client to send him to the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux, where he won first prize in figure painting for a depiction of Saint Roch. To earn extra money, he designed labels for jams and preserves.

Through his uncle, Bouguereau was given a commission to paint portraits of parishioners, and when his aunt matched the sum he earned, Bouguereau went to Paris and became a student at the École des Beaux-Arts. To supplement his formal training in drawing, he attended anatomical dissections and studied historical costumes and archeology. He was admitted to the studio of François-Edouard Picot, where he studied painting in the academic style. Academic painting placed the highest status on historical and mythological subjects and Bouguereau won the coveted Prix de Rome in 1850, with his Zenobia Found by Shepherds on the Banks of the Araxes. His reward was a year at the Villa Medici in Rome, Italy, where in addition to formal lessons he was able to study first-hand the Renaissance artists and their masterpieces, as well as Greek, Etruscan, and Roman antiquities. He also studied classical literature, which influenced his subject choice for the rest of career.

Bouguereau, painting entirely within the traditional Academic style, exhibited at the annual exhibitions of the Paris Salon for his entire working life. An early reviewer stated, “M. Bouguereau has a natural instinct and knowledge of contour. The eurythmie of the human body preoccupies him, and in recalling the happy results which, in this genre, the ancients and the artists of the sixteenth century arrived at, one can only congratulate M. Bouguereau in attempting to follow in their footsteps…Raphael was inspired by the ancients…and no one accused him of not being original.”

Raphael was a favorite of Bouguereau and he took this review as a high compliment. He had fulfilled one of the requirements of the Prix de Rome by completing an old-master copy of Raphael’s The Triumph of Galatea. In many of his works, he followed the same classical approach to composition, form, and subject matter. Bouguereau's graceful portraits of women were considered very charming, partly because he could beautify a sitter while also retaining her likeness.

In 1856, he married Marie-Nelly Monchablon and subsequently had five children. By the late 1850s, he had made strong connections with art dealers, particularly Paul Durand-Ruel (later the champion of the Impressionists), who helped clients buy paintings from artists who exhibited at the Salons.Thanks to Paul Durand-Ruel, Bouguereau met Hugues Merle, who later often was compared to Bouguereau. The Salons annually drew over 300,000 people, providing valuable exposure to exhibited artists. Bouguereau’s fame extended to England by the 1860s, and he bought a large house and studio in Montparnasse with his growing income.

Bouguereau was a staunch traditionalist whose genre paintings and mythological themes were modern interpretations of Classical subjects, both pagan and Christian, with a concentration on the naked female human body. The idealized world of his paintings, brought to life goddesses, nymphs, bathers, shepherdesses, and madonnas in a way that appealed to wealthy art patrons of the era.

Bouguereau employed traditional methods of working up a painting, including detailed pencil studies and oil sketches, and his careful method resulted in a pleasing and accurate rendering of the human form. His painting of skin, hands, and feet was particularly admired. He also used some of the religious and erotic symbolism of the Old Masters, such as the “broken pitcher” which connoted lost innocence.

Bouguereau received many commissions to decorate private houses, public buildings, and churches. As was typical of such commissions, Bouguereau would sometimes paint in his own style, and at other times conform to an existing group style. Early on, Bouguereau was commissioned in all three venues, which added enormously to his prestige and fame. He also made reductions of his public paintings for sale to patrons, of which The Annunciation (1888) is an example. He was also a successful portrait painter and many of his paintings of wealthy patrons remain in private hands.

Bouguereau steadily gained the honors of the Academy, reaching Life Member in 1876, and Commander of the Legion of Honor and Grand Medal of Honor in 1885. He began to teach drawing at the Académie Julian in 1875, a co-ed art institution independent of the École des Beaux-Arts, with no entrance exams and with nominal fees.

In 1877, both his wife and infant son died. At a rather advanced age, Bouguereau was married for the second time in 1896, to fellow artist Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau, one of his pupils. He used his influence to open many French art institutions to women for the first time, including the Académie française.

Near the end of his life he described his love of his art: “Each day I go to my studio full of joy; in the evening when obliged to stop because of darkness I can scarcely wait for the next morning to come…if I cannot give myself to my dear painting I am miserable”. He painted 826 paintings.

In the spring of 1905, Bouguereau's house and studio in Paris were burgled. On August 19, 1905, Bouguereau died in La Rochelle at the age of 79 from heart disease.

In his own time, Bouguereau was considered to be one of the greatest painters in the world by the Academic art community, and simultaneously he was reviled by the avant-garde. He also gained wide fame in Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, and in the United States, and commanded high prices.

Bouguereau’s career was close to a direct ascent with hardly a setback. To many, he epitomized taste and refinement, and a respect for tradition. To others, he was a competent technician stuck in the past. Degas and his associates used the term “Bouguereauté” in a derogatory manner to describe any artistic style reliant on “slick and artificial surfaces”, also known as a licked finish. In an 1872 letter, Degas wrote that he strove to emulate Bouguereau’s ordered and productive working style, although with Degas' famous trenchant wit, and the aesthetic tendencies of the Impressionists, it is possible the statement was meant to be ironic.

Bouguereau’s works were eagerly bought by American millionaires who considered him the most important French artist of that time. But after 1920, Bouguereau fell into disrepute, due in part to changing tastes and partly to his staunch opposition to the Impressionists who were finally gaining acceptance. For decades following, his name was not even mentioned in encyclopedias.

Sources on his full name are contradictory: it is sometimes given as William-Adolphe Bouguereau (composed name), William Adolphe Bouguereau (usual and civil-only names according to the French tradition), while in other occasions it appears as Adolphe William Bouguereau (with Adolphe as the usual name). However, the artist used to sign his works simply as William Bouguereau (hinting "William" was his given name, whatever the order), or more precisely as "W.Bouguereau.date" (French alphabet) and later as "W-BOVGVEREAV-date" (Latin alphabet).

From the 1860s, Bouguereau was closely associated with the Académie Julian where he gave lessons and advice to art students, male and female, from around the world. During several decades he taught drawing and painting to hundreds, if not thousands, of students. Many of them managed to establish artistic careers in their own countries, sometimes following his academic style, and in other cases, rebelling against it, like Henri Matisse. He married his most famous pupil, Elizabeth Jane Gardner, after the death of his first wife.

In 1974, the New York Cultural Center staged a show of Bouguereau's work as a curiosity. In 1984, the Borghi Gallery hosted the commercial show of his 23 oil paintings and 1 drawing. In the same year a major exhibition was organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, in Canada. The exhibition opened at the Musée du Petit-Palais, in Paris, traveled to The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, and concluded in Montréal. In 1997 Mark Borghi and Laura Borghi organized an early Internet exhibition. A 2005 exhibit of three works by Bouguereau at the J. Paul Getty Museum, "instantly became the single most popular work at the museum, ultimately building to tens of thousands of visitors clogging the halls waiting their turn to see the exhibit." Recently Bouguereau's popularity has seen a revival partially due to the work of the Art Renewal Center, which features him as the most popular artist on the site. Bouguereau's works are in many public collections.

[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 10Ko]

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (November 30, 1825 – August 19, 1905) was a French academic painter. William Bouguereau (pronounced vill-yam boo-guh-roe) was a staunch traditionalist whose realistic genre paintings and mythological themes were modern interpretations of Classical subjects with a heavy emphasis on the female human body. Although he created an idealized world, his almost photo-realistic style was popular with rich art patrons. He was very famous in his time but today his subject matter and technique receive relatively little attention compared to the popularity of the Impressionists.

Life and career


William-Adolphe Bouguereau was born in La Rochelle, France on November 30, 1825, into a family of wine and olive oil merchants. He seemed destined to join the family business but for the intervention of his uncle Eugène, a curate, who taught him classical and biblical subjects, and arranged for Bouguereau to go to high school. Bouguereau showed artistic talent early on and his father was convinced by a client to send him to the École des Beaux-Arts in Bordeaux, where he won first prize in figure painting for a depiction of Saint Roch. To earn extra money, he designed labels for jams and preserves.
Through his uncle, Bouguereau was given a commission to paint portraits of parishioners, and when his aunt matched the sum he earned, Bouguereau went to Paris and became a student at the École des Beaux-Arts. To supplement his formal training in drawing, he attended anatomical dissections and studied historical costumes and archeology. He was admitted to the studio of François-Edouard Picot, where he studied painting in the academic style. Academic painting placed the highest status on historical and mythological subjects and Bouguereau won the coveted Prix de Rome in 1850, with his Zenobia Found by Shepherds on the Banks of the Araxes. His reward was a stay at the Villa Medici in Rome, Italy, where in addition to formal lessons he was able to study first-hand the Renaissance artists and their masterpieces.


Bouguereau, completely in tune with the traditional Academic style, exhibited at the annual exhibitions of the Paris Salon for his entire working life.
Detail from The Birth of Venus by Bouguereau.An early reviewer stated, “M. Bouguereau has a natural instinct and knowledge of contour. The eurythmie of the human body preoccupies him, and in recalling the happy results which, in this genre, the ancients and the artists of the sixteenth century arrived at, one can only congratulate M. Bouguereau in attempting to follow in their footsteps…Raphael was inspired by the ancients…and no one accused him of not being original.”


Raphael was a favorite of Bouguereau and he took this review as a high compliment. He had fulfilled one of the requirements of the Prix de Rome by completing an old-master copy of Raphael’s The Triumph of Galatea. In many of his works, he followed the same classical approach to composition, form, and subject matter. Bouguereau's graceful portraits of women were very charming, partly because he could beautify a sitter while also retaining her likeness.


In 1856, he married Marie-Nelly Monchablon and subsequently had five children. By the late 1850s, he made strong connections with art dealers, particularly Paul Durand-Ruel (later the champion of the Impressionists), who helped clients buy paintings from artists who exhibited at the Salons. The Salons annually drew over 300,000 people, thereby providing valuable exposure to exhibited artists. Bouguereau’s fame extended to England by the 1860s and then he bought a large house and studio in Montparnasse with his growing income.


Bouguereau was a staunch traditionalist whose realistic genre paintings and mythological themes were modern interpretations of Classical subjects—both pagan and Christian—with a heavy concentration on the female human body. Although he created an idealized world, his almost photo-realistic style brought to life his goddesses, nymphs, bathers, shepherdesses, and madonnas in a way which was very appealing to rich art patrons of his time. Some critics, however, preferred the honesty of Jean-François Millet’s truer-to-life depiction of hard-working farmers and laborers.
Bouguereau employed traditional methods of working up a painting, including detailed pencil studies and oil sketches, and his careful method resulted in a pleasing and accurate rendering of the human form. His painting of skin, hands, and feet was particularly admired. He also used some of the religious and erotic symbolism of the Old Masters, such as the “broken pitcher” which connoted lost innocence.


One of the rewards of staying within the Academic style and doing well in the Salons was receiving commissions to decorate private houses, public buildings, and churches. As was typical of these commissions, sometimes Bouguereau would paint in his own style, and other times he had to conform to an existing group style. Early on, Bouguereau was commissioned in all three venues, which added enormously to his prestige and fame. He also made reductions of his public paintings for sale to patrons, of which The Annunciation (1888) is an example. He was also a successful portrait painter though many of his paintings of wealthy patrons still remain in private hands.


Bouguereau steadily gained the honors of the Academy, reaching Life Member in 1876, and Commander of the Legion of Honor and Grand Medal of Honor in 1885. He began to teach drawing at the Académie Julian in 1875, a co-ed art institution independent of the École des Beaux-Arts, with no entrance exams and with nominal fees.
In 1877, both his wife and infant son died. At a rather advanced age, Bouguereau was married for the second time in 1896, to fellow artist Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau, one of his pupils. He also used his influence to open many French art institutions to women for the first time, including the Académie française.
Near the end of his life he described his love of his art, “Each day I go to my studio full of joy; in the evening when obliged to stop because of darkness I can scarcely wait for the next morning to come…if I cannot give myself to my dear painting I am miserable”. He painted eight hundred and twenty-six paintings.


In the spring of 1905, Bouguereau's house and studio in Paris were robbed. On August 19, 1905, Bouguereau died in La Rochelle at the age of 79 from heart disease.


Fame and fall


Tête d'Etude l'Oiseau (1867)In his own time, Bouguereau was considered to be one of the greatest painters in the world by the Academic art community, and simultaneously he was reviled by the avant-garde. He also gained wide fame in Belgium, Holland, Spain, and in the United States, and commanded high prices.
Bouguereau’s career was a nearly straight up ascent with hardly a setback. To many, he epitomized taste and refinement, and a respect for tradition. To others, he was a competent technician stuck in the past. Degas and his associates used the term “Bouguereauté” in a derogatory manner to describe any artistic style reliant on “slick and artificial surfaces”, also known as a licked finish. In an 1872 letter, Degas wrote that he strove to emulate Bouguereau’s ordered and productive working style, although with Degas' famous trenchant wit, and the aesthetic tendencies of the two Impressionists, it is possible the statement was meant to be ironic.
Bouguereau’s works were eagerly bought by American millionaires who considered him the most important French artist of that time. But after 1920, Bouguereau fell into disrepute, due in part to changing tastes and partly to his staunch opposition to the Impressionists who were finally gaining acceptance. For decades following, his name was not even mentioned in encyclopedias.
His name
Sources on his full name are contradictory: some give William-Adolphe Bouguereau (composed name), William Adolphe Bouguereau (usual and civil-only names according to the French tradition), while others give Adolphe William Bouguereau (with Adolphe as the usual name). However, the artist used to sign his works simply as William Bouguereau (hinting "William" was his given name, whatever the order), or more precisely as "W.Bouguereau.date" (French alphabet) and later as "W-BOVGVEREAV-date" (Latin alphabet).
Bouguereau's signature (detail).


Legacy


In 1974, the New York Cultural Center staged a show of Bouguereau's work as a curiosity. In 1984, the Borghi Gallery hosted the commercial show of his 23 oil paintings and 1 drawing. In the same year a major exhibition was organized by the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, in Canada. The exhibition opened at the Musée du Petit-Palais, in Paris, traveled to The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, and concluded in Montréal. This was the beginning of renewal of interest about Bouguereau. In 1997 Mark Borghi and Laura Borghi organized an early Internet exhibition. Bouguereau present day supporters also include New Jersey millionaire, businessman, and art collector Fred Ross whose internet-based Art Renewal Center heavily features Bouguereau's work as part of their advocacy for the re-appreciation of academic art. Today, over one hundred museums throughout the world exhibit Bouguereau's works.

[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 11Ko]
William Bouguereau (30 novembre 1825 - 19 août 1905), né et mort à La Rochelle était un peintre français de style académique. Biographie La naissance de Venus (1879)Les sources sur son état-civil complet sont contradictoires : certaines donnent William Adolphe Bouguereau, d'autres indiquent Adolphe William Bouguereau. La dénomination d'usage est Wi...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 5Ko]
ADOLPHE WILLIAM BOUGUEREAU La Rochelle 1825-1905 Paris Il fit ses études à l'Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux puis à celle de Paris. De 1846 à 1850 , il séjourna à Rome comme colauréat du grand prix avec Baudry. Mais sa participation à l'Exposition Universelle de Paris qui le consacra. il se vit confier des commandes publiques pour le grand théâtre...
William Bouguereau, né le 30 novembre 1825 à La Rochelle où il est mort le 19 août 1905, est un peintre français représentatif de la peinture académique. Son acte de naissance indique Adolphe Williams Bouguereau, mais la dénomination d'usage est celle de la signature de ses tableaux, William Bouguereau. Il est le fils d'un négociant en vins de Bord...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 11Ko]
William Adolphe Bouguereau [vijɑ̃ adɔlf buɡø'ʁo] (auch Adolphe-William Bouguereau * 30. November 1825 in La Rochelle † 19. August 1905 ebenda) war ein französischer Maler des 19. Jahrhunderts. Er studierte an der École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris und gilt als Meister des Akademischen Klassizismus und des Klassischen Realismus. Bo...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 3Ko]
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (La Rochelle, 30 novembre 1825 – La Rochelle, 19 agosto 1905) è stato un pittore francese. Studiò all'Académie Julian di Parigi e fu autore di quadri realistici riguardanti tanti temi mitologici (come Flora e Zefiro, del 1875, custodito a Mulhouse, e la Nascita di Venere del 1879, conservato a Nantes) sia temi sacri nei q...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 3Ko]
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (La Rochelle 30 de noviembre de 1825 – 19 de agosto de 1905) fue un pintor francés del realismo burgués. Alumno de Picot en París con 21 años y pensionado en la Villa Médici romana con 25. Hombre fuerte del academicismo francés, primer presidente del departamento de pintura de la Sociedad de Artistas Franceses y gran favo...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 7Ko]
Адо́льф Вилья́м Бугро́ (фр. Adolphe Williams Bouguereau 30 ноября 1825, Ла-Рошель, Франция — 19 августа 1905, Ла-Рошель, Франция) — французский живописец, мастер академической живописи, крупнейший представитель салонного академизма, автор картин на исторические, мифологические, библейские и аллегорические сюжеты, исполнял стенные росписи и портрет...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 5Ko]
威廉·阿道夫·布格罗(William Adolphe Bouguereau,1825年11月30日 - 1905年8月19日),是19世纪末的法国学院派画家。 布格罗1825年出生于法国比斯开湾小城拉罗歇尔。 布格罗的父亲是小商人,先做葡萄酒生意,后做橄榄油生意。布格罗先在波尔多的艺术学校半工半读两年,学习绘画。1846年用卖出33幅画像的900法郎加上亲戚的筹款,布格罗到巴黎的法朗索瓦·爱德华·皮柯特画室学习,两个月后作为100名学生中的第99名进入巴黎国家高等美术学院。1850年得法国国家艺术奖学金罗马大奖。布格罗用4000法郎奖金及拉罗谢尔市的600法郎前往意大利留学。与其他罗马大奖获奖者一起居住在著名的美第奇别墅,布格罗游历了意大利的许多城市,模拟古代及文艺复兴时期艺术家的作品。后曾...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 2Ko]
William-Adolphe Bouguereau (La Rochelle, 30 de novembro de 1825 – La Rochelle, 19 de agosto de 1905) foi um professor e pintor acadêmico francês. Com um talento manifesto desde a infância, recebeu treinamento artístico em uma das mais prestigiadas escolas de arte de seu tempo, a Escola de Belas Artes de Paris, onde veio a ser mais tarde professor m...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 15Ko]
p ウィリアム・アドルフ・ブグロー(William Adolphe Bouguereau, 1825年11月30日 - 1905年8月19日)は、フランスの画家。ラ・ロシェルに生まれる。19世紀フランスのアカデミズム絵画を代表する画家で、神話や天使、少女を題材とした絵画を多く残した。日本語では「ブーグロー」とも表記する。 ブグローは1825年、フランス西部の大西洋に面した港町・ラ・ロシェルに生まれた。1846年、パリへ出てエコール・デ・ボザール(国立美術学校)に学ぶ。1850年にはローマ賞(新進美術家に与えられる最高の賞)を得て公費でイタリアに留学し、同地に4年間滞在した。1876年には美術アカデミー会員となり、1888年にはエコール・デ・ボザールの教授に就任している。 画風はアングルなどの...
[Biography - William Adolphe Bouguereau - 2Ko]
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